arachnomatic:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

There’s a notorious corner (or possibly the doorway before it) where all the art teachers just stop and stare blankly for a while before going on with our day.

arachnomatic:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

There’s a notorious corner (or possibly the doorway before it) where all the art teachers just stop and stare blankly for a while before going on with our day.


Track Title: Here I Land

Artist: Nicholas Stevenson

weatherofnightvale:

Welcome to Night Vale 52: The Retirement of Pamela Winchell

Nicholas Stevenson - Here I Land

Get it here: http://www.nicholasstevenson.co.uk/


Come and get your love…

madgirlf:

ass-ume:

policymic:

17 lies we need to stop teaching girls about sex

Fueled by outdated ideals of gender roles and the sense that female sexuality is somehow shameful, there are certain pernicious myths about girls and sex that just won’t die. That sex education in America has gaping holes doesn’t help much, either; in a recent Centers for Disease Control (CDC) report, just 6 out of 10 girls said that their schools’ sex ed curriculum included information on how to say no to sex. This lack of personal agency was reflected in a forthcoming study by sociologist Heather Hlavka at Marquette University as well, which found that many young girls think of sex simply as something that is “done to them.”

Read moreFollow policymic

THIS THIS THIS

Yessssss


areyoutryingtodeduceme:

areyoutryingtodeduceme:

no but imagine Parrish secretly thinking in his head ‘oh my god I have just awoken my latent super powers I am actually a real life super hero wait all of these dumb kids also have super powers CAN WE BE THE X-MEN OF BEACON HILLS’ and he secretly calls the Sheriff Professor X in his heart of hearts

# parrish gets more excited about vigilante justice than ANY of them  # derek and scott play rock paper scissors over who has to tell him that the mask is excessive  (via mercutiolicious)


ladybubblegum:

rustypolished:

SO LYDIA’S GRANDMOTHER WAS A QUEER COMPUTER ENGINEER IN THE 60s/70s?! 

CAN WE PLEASE TALK ABOUT THIS?

this is so important to me, you have no idea


bleep0bleep:

krysylyn86:

So, wait, did no one see the naked man covered in ash running around town? Or do they just see it and ignore it, because it’s normal for Beacon Hills? He probably gave little old ladies and some little old men heart attacks. Put that away Deputy, there are people faint of heart who live in this town.

image


(i miss you, miss you)

semi-attractive:

when ur makeup doesnt come off in the shower

image


So I get that it leads to dramatic lighting and all that, but does Derek’s loft not have electricity? I spent a lot of that episode wondering why no one had switched on the light.